Tuesday, August 01, 2006

WHYBINS PROMOTES SPECIAL OLYMPICS


Whybin\TBWA Sydney has created a campaign to promote the Special Olympics, directed by former Arnold Australia partner, Rodd Martin, who is now a full-time director, represented by
  • The Guild


  • CREDITS
    Client: Special Olympics Australia
    Agency: Whybin TBWA, Sydney
    Copywriter: Misha McDonald
    Art Director: Dave O'Sullivan
    Director: Rodd Martin
    Producer: Helene Nicol
    Production Company: The Guild

    32 Comments:

    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Well done Rodd, a great spot....you were right to give up your day job.

    8:31 AM  
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    yeah nicely done

    9:11 AM  
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    What a pity that pretty much the same idea was done out of London a few years back. Down's Syndrome dude (just like this guy) talking to camera, saying that people were staring at him, yelling at him, etc... leading us to believe that they were putting him down... only for him to say at the end 'It was great'... bring up Special Olympics logo.

    Different execution, but the exact same thought.

    Not Rodd's fault though. He's just the director.

    9:40 AM  
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    mish here. that ad you are talking about is on air right now (not three years ago) and it is a completely different idea be-atch. Peace.

    11:15 AM  
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    The ad from a few years ago is actually running on air right now as well and seeing them both together in the one evening, they didn't seem the same at all.

    Anyway, opinions are like assholes - everyone's got one. Except in this business where everyone seems to have more!

    11:15 AM  
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    I thought it was not wholly dissimilar to the ad for Scope where people are giving the guy a funny look because he's making funny noises then we realise he's listening to radiohead.

    The problem I have with ads like this is that it's the sort of stuff I have to explain to my 5 year old. That is, people like that are just the same as normal people beyond their 'Disability'. I find it a bit embarassing and somewhat partronising (that means talking down to people) to think that grown ups still need to be told these elementary facts of life- I certainly don't. Did anybody else not understand or is the message reserved for the population at large, who, of course aren't as clever as us blessed advertising folk.

    12:29 PM  
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Nice and predictable, do'nt you think?

    12:45 PM  
    Anonymous George said...

    An ad for the Special Olympics from a very special agency

    1:04 PM  
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Well ,it works for me.I saw it on MTV and it provoked an interesting,positive discussion on the whole issue of mental disability and the difference between the 'Special Olympics' and the' Paralympics'

    1:07 PM  
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Having worked with the disabled in the past, I can honestly say that ads like this simply draw attention to supposed prejudice.

    Disabled people would much rather ads be run that simply announced the Special Olympics in the same way you'd announce games for anyone else.

    No silly gags about funny faces, noises or implied prejudice.

    We might think they're awfully clever.

    To the disabled, it simply reinforces the fact that society doesn't deem them worthy of a sporty execution. Just a little bit of catharsis for the able-bodied.

    Peace.

    1:45 PM  
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Misha working with Garry again.
    What Magic.

    2:19 PM  
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Well said 1.45, that's sort of what I was getting at at 12.29.

    2:34 PM  
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    "Having worked with the disabled in the past, I can honestly say that ads like this simply draw attention to supposed prejudice.

    Disabled people would much rather ads be run that simply announced the Special Olympics in the same way you'd announce games for anyone else."


    Problem here, of course, is that disabled people are not the target audience. And the broader population needs a solid motivation to go and watch people who aren't posting world-class times run around a field. Pity and guilt are two potential motivators.

    Harsh words, I know. Welcome to advertising.

    2:52 PM  
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    To all you goody- two- shoes who don't accept that people with disabilities are not embraced by the general population, tough tit! I think the spot showed a positive image of the guy in the workplace and the pay-off made you smile with him, not at him. Yes you have to make spots like this to have people reconsider their prejudice. A straight, patriotic, sporting execution is cringe-making even with able bodied athletes. Nicely understated direction and a good idea that didn't make you curl your toes.

    2:55 PM  
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Hate to be bitter, but no creative wants to make a positive, uplifting ad about the phenomenal achievements of special olympians when it's far nicer to make a gag.

    I quote..."Problem here, of course, is that disabled people are not the target audience. And the broader population needs a solid motivation to go and watch people who aren't posting world-class times run around a field.."

    I agree mate, but we're not going to move forward as a society if we don't accept that special olympians are still sportsmen - and they want to be treated as such. Maybe an ad that treated them like sportsmen would encourage people to watch the games.

    This ad isn't constructed to allow the consumer any chance to make a decision as to why they'd go. Sympathy seems to be your selling point - I'd rather see shots of their utter human endeavour.

    But then, it's not really the clever ad you wanted to make is it?

    3:24 PM  
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    What a pity that pretty much the same idea was done out of London a few years back. Down's Syndrome dude (just like this guy) talking to camera, saying that people were staring at him, yelling at him, etc... leading us to believe that they were putting him down... only for him to say at the end 'It was great'... bring up Special Olympics logo.

    Different execution, but the exact same thought.


    Absolutely. This particularly heavy handed execution obviously subscribes to the notion that "people are stupid" so we have to make it really "obvious" for them.

    Much like that silly Tooheys New "For the Love of Beer" ad ripping off the much better Millers campaign.

    *Yawn*. Next.

    3:27 PM  
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    "I agree mate, but we're not going to move forward as a society if we don't accept that special olympians are still sportsmen - and they want to be treated as such. Maybe an ad that treated them like sportsmen would encourage people to watch the games.

    I agree with you too. I said pity and guilt were two potential motivators. I didn't say they were the only ones, nor did I say they were the best.

    As for "moving forward as a society", that's a noble ambition. But, alas, it's rarely the role for advertising.

    (By the way, you seem to be implying that I had something to do with the making of the ads. I didn't.)

    -2:52PM

    3:42 PM  
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    "Much like that silly Tooheys New "For the Love of Beer" ad ripping off the much better Millers campaign."

    Now you're just fishing for responses. I think we finished that debate a few months back.

    3:44 PM  
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Very nice spot, beautifully shot.

    I've seen Rodd's reel. Who'd have thought it...he actually knows what he's doing!?...as strong as any performance director out there

    3:57 PM  
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    I agree with 3:57,well ,done Rodd, lovely spot.

    4:25 PM  
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Being a sad creative wanker, I have to admit that one of the failings of this industry is to see a brief like 'Special Olympics' as an opportunity to make a clever spot, rather than actually trying to herald what these guys have achieved with, let's face it, far more challenges in their lives than us.

    In fact, a brief like this should gently remind us that for all our petty bitching, there are people out there winning metal for far more impressive things than a one-off DPS.

    5:18 PM  
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    were's my earlier response gone lynchy.

    all i said was that people in this industry who do "similar" ideas who claim they don't read award annuals should read them.

    What's so libellous about that??????

    5:30 PM  
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    That last comment is absolute bullshite. My first impression while watching the ad was, nice thought badly executed. The performances lacked subtelty. The edit is clunky. There are a dozen directors I can think of off the top of my head more adept with talent.

    5:33 PM  
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Everyone's thinking way too much about this. People in advertising take it way too seriously. Advertising to advertising people for the most part. I'm sure the Average Joe would get this idea without breaking a sweat. I don't know if it will get people to go though. I'm thinking about it too much.

    5:34 PM  
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    I'd be happy to say I did it. No, I didn't do it.

    5:35 PM  
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    I'm with 5:33. Ad's O.K but it's not directed brilliantly. Specially those two blokes at the end were as subtle as a Rhino on a china shop. The grading looks old fashioned.
    Overall, again, it's OK, but not brilliant.

    9:36 AM  
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    5:33 and 9:36 are definitely in the minority here. A couple of out of work directors me thinks.

    11:10 AM  
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    nup. i agree with 5:33 and 9:36. A good idea averagely directed. There are some really good talent directors out there who would have really made the build up something special. Anyhoo, there you go.
    oh, also - i'm not a director, out of work or otherwise....

    12:37 PM  
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Hey 12:37, you're latest Bunnings campaign is one of your best.

    12:27 PM  
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Hey 12:27pm and 11:10am, why are you so desperate to discredit anyone who thinks the direction of this spot was ordinary? I think it stunk, and I'm a copywriter, so save your shoddy-director gags.

    Direction aside, the biggest issue I have with this spot is the idea. I agree with the earlier comments that this ad is patronising to both the athletes and the viewers. It's the sort of ad you'd expect David Brent to write for the Special Olympics.

    The use of pity ain't clever or necessary. It's just corny.

    5:56 PM  
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    Thanks 12:27, I like it a lot too. But shouldn't you be drawing up your writer's ideas instead of making these embarrassingly inept attempts at entertaining the sad depressives who seem to congregate on this blog? From your inability to spell, your lack of wit and failure to make any sort of point you're obviously nothing more than a WRIST.

    7:48 PM  
    Anonymous Anonymous said...

    From a Special Olympics point of view it's great to hear your comments.

    I guess one of the things it shows is that we are not actually getting the message across that Special Olympics is not about a Games that happens every four years, like the Olympics.

    Instead our athletes are training and competing all year-round and while we love people to come and watch the big events it's the day to day areas where we need much support and understanding.

    The big events are a great spectacle of competition no doubt about it and some of the achievments are compatable to mainstream competitions but people with an intellectual disability - of all ability levels - are achieving their best through sport on a regular basis...and the benefits to them and their community are huge.

    7:13 PM  

    Post a Comment

    << Home