Friday, March 31, 2006

AFA YOUNGBLOODS WANT TO KNOW WHAT YOUNG AD PEOPLE REALLY THINK

AFA Youngbloods wants to find out what’s inside the minds of the under-30s working in the advertising industry.
AFA Youngbloods, a division of the Advertising Federation of Australia, is conducting a survey to better understand the attitudes and aspirations of its members.
The survey results will be used to lift the profile of the Youngbloods on a national level, attract sponsors and increase attendance at Youngbloods events.
The aim of AFA Youngbloods is to provide opportunities for young people to learn from business leaders, network with their peers and have a say on industry issues and future direction.
It is represented in all states by a core committee of young people working in the industry.

DETAILS
The AFA Youngbloods will be launching a nationwide online survey to their database of members.
The Survey will be launched 30 March, 2006.
Those who complete the survey will go into the draw to win an iPod Nano.
The winner will be drawn 20 April, 2006.
The database consists of over 1,115 names, of those under the age of 30, working in the advertising and media profession.
Survey aims to gather data on those working as professionals in the advertising and media industries.
The AFA – Youngbloods state chairpersons, have worked together to write a series of 32 multiple choice research questions that they hope will provide them with a closer understanding of the under 30s segment of the profession.

A) Ambitions, aspirations and the professional status of Youngbloods members.

B) Attitudes and opinions about the Advertising profession by Youngbloods members.

C) Attitudes and opions about management structures and styles in agencies.

D) Professional development aspirations.

For full access to the complete survey:
Go to http://www.surveymonkey.com/s.asp?u=925101716411
The results will be used to lift the profile of the Youngbloods on a national level, attract sponsors and increase attendance at Youngbloods events.
The results of the survey will also be released to the media and industry stakeholders for reference.
The survey will close on 19 April, 2006.
The survey will also be available to complete on the AFA website:
www.afa.org.au

For any further questions about the survey, please contact AFA Youngbloods Victorian chairperson, Tess Blair: 03 8416 6729.

23 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

Q. "AFA Youngbloods wants to find out what’s inside the minds of the under-30s working in the advertising industry."

A. "How come we missed out on all the fast cars, sex and drugs that built the industry in the '80s?"

1:34 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

That applies to everyone under 40.

2:05 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

The Australian Ad Industry was really built in the 70s when all hot creatives - especially those at The Palace and Masius in Melbourne - drove fast cars and fucked junior art directors (of both sexes) with impunity any time they pleased. They were copying the U.S. Industry which had their fun a decade prior. AIDS killed the orgies in the 80s (although we still had the fast cars as compensation and spent more money on black clothes and even longer lunches - although the latter stopped when FBT came in around 1986). I pity the young ones today - it's a very dull, boring Industry - at least compared to every decade before. Although not as dull as working in a bank (unless you work on the Comm Bank at Singo's), so stick with it.

2:21 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

The AFA Youngbloods should forget surveys and just tell their members to start creating a great industry again. Every other generation has done something but the latest lot have done nothing.

I mean, where are all the start-ups of the Noughties? In the 70s and 80s, the great creative shops were started by young and hungry, super talented people still in their 20s. Shit, Lionel started The Palace when he was 28. Belgiovane started BAM when he was 28. Siimon Reynolds started Omon when he was 22.

It's still a young person's business, hurry up, your time starts now!

2:46 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

fuck all this shit. it should be warning them that the next 10 years are going to a pack of bollocks - you're going to hit your mid 30's and realise you've wasted your creativity and you should have gone and made those music videos or written that book.

As to start ups - start up a juice bar, it's better for your karma.

9:56 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

fuck all this shit. it should be warning them that the next 10 years are going to a pack of bollocks - you're going to hit your mid 30's and realise you've wasted your creativity and you should have gone and made those music videos or written that book.

As to start ups - start up a juice bar, it's better for your karma.

9:56 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

fuck all this shit. it should be warning them that the next 10 years are going to a pack of bollocks - you're going to hit your mid 30's and realise you've wasted your creativity and you should have gone and made those music videos or written that book.

As to start ups - start up a juice bar, it's better for your karma.

9:56 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Just because that happened to you, hack, doesn't mean we're all going to end up fucked. In case you hadn't realised, advertising is going through huge changes that are far more exciting than directing a music video or writing a book. (You should come to LA, mate). Now, isn't that brochure copy due first thing Monday? Get back to it, hack.

10:10 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

LA's for pussies. I work in amsterdam.

the hack

8:12 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

A decade too late, mate. Apart from 180 (is that you Andy?) Amsterdam had its day in the mid 90s (when the likes of Ben Nott and Adam Hunt went through there and Paul Meijer at Y&R won five Gold Lions at Cannes in one year). By the way, Ben - and Droga - are in LA these days, because that's where the action is now. You know, California, where they are inventing the future - i-pods, EA video games, branded entertainment, films, convergence - fuck, it's a whole new world. All the Dutch are good at is doing drugs and making cheese (and sticking fingers in dykes). Oh, and ripping off old Nike ads for adidas.

8:41 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

The states? the future? that was the last century. new one now. those boys in shanghai think we're all bunch of twats. I think we need to look at that juice bar.

9:34 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

as someone who worked on nike in portland, i am wondering what 7:41 defines as a nike ad? if you look at the work over the years it's as varied as any client's in history.

amsterdam is one of the few world class advertising cities on the planet, and i'm not just talking about W+K and 180. the dutch always do well in cannes - for good reason.

LA is a creative hub. it hasn't translated that well into consistent great advertising over the years compared with smaller cities like san fran, potland, minneapolis or miami. if you're in LA why write ads when you can make much better $$ and achieve some cache writing TV, films etc. advertising is a poor cousin in that city. out of the thousands of ads they make a year chiat always squeezes a few good ones out. 72 and sunny has the pedigree to make a name. secret weapon marketing does ok. am i missing anyone??

it doesn't matter where you live. or what someone else did 10 years ago. it matters what you do.

xoxo

captain america.

we now resume normal programming...

10:08 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

The Chinese have never invented anything since gunpowder, moron (or is that you Sydney Suit?). And certainly not any good in the communications caper, or they would have a judge at Cannes this year.

Shanghai and Beijing are being recreated into the most amazing cities on earth by the best Western architects in the world (including a few Aussies who are doing the Olympics Stadium and the Swimming complex, both contenders for the most beautiful buildings of the new century). The Chinese will continue to be mega consumers of Western stuff, like mobile phones and i-pods and video games, etc. Same goes for India, which is actually where the big consumer growth is right now and for the next decade (200 million middle class) until the Chinese catch up. The Japanese and Koreans are only slightly better than the Chinese, simply because both have a knack of making Western inventions cheaper (and sometimes better, like PlayStation - it's ancestor was an Atari, incidentally where Steve Jobs got his start - although all the cool games for Playstation comes out of EA in Playa Del Rey, California - just down the road from where I am).

You have got to get this: The Creative Economy of the Future is in the USA (and some parts of Europe).
The Production and Consumer Economy of the Future is China and India.

But just to amuse myself, Sydney Suit, please provide a list of this great Chinese technology. Or even know-how?

10:23 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Dear Captain America,

The Dutch don't always do well in Cannes - at least for the last decade since the days of Paul Meijer, which was my point. The exception was the two Gold Lions won by 180 in 2004, both for Adidas - and both could easily have a Nike logo at the end. (Incidentally, one created by an Aussie, Andy Fackrell who was also co-CD on the other).

(But that was hardly special. Australia won three Gold Lions and one Silver Lion that same year).

Shit, Thailand, Singapore, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa all have a better record at Cannes over the last decade than The Netherlands. Not to mention the superstar nations: US, UK, Brazil, France, Germany, Spain. Fuck, almost every ad nation on earth (except China of course!) is better than the Dutch in recent years.

10:56 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Captain America replies - the truth, 9:56 in the am, will set you free.

let's take 2004 as you suggested. i will only include film lions as i couldn't be shagged doing the whole show - and let's face it, the other stuff ain't as sexy except for the ti award.

Dutch FILM winners 2004.

Jounalists Award: w+k: musical chairs - nike
Gold: w+k - musical chais - nike
Gold: 180 - Long Run - adidas
Gold: 180 - Laila - adidas
Gold: 180 - wake up - adidas
Silver: DDB - welcome - VW
Bronze: DDB - Cleaning ladies - Centraal Beheer
Bronze: 180 - Rugby mirror - adidas
Bronze: w+k - the other game - nike
Bronze: 180 - keepy uppy - adidas
Bronze: 180: kicking it - adidas
Bronze: Landing - TBWA - Euro 2004
Bronze: Saatchi & Saatchi - Mr Mulder - Lottery tickets
Bronze: DDB - Delivery guy - VW


that my children, is good diverse FILM only haul for a relatively small city. the whole country's population is much smaller than australia's. and that is with a nothing year from kramer-krasselt.

australia, NZ, SA etc - sadly not even in the ball park.

trust the Capt. peoples, he serves it up straight.

3:18 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

400 000 people or so. One agency last year won more golds than the whole of australia - springer&jacoby with a nice total 4 golds. Anyone who believes that amsterdam can't punch its weight in creativity, hasn't been here. it's a little tradition they started with van gogh, rembrandt and vermeer. but who are those punks anyway - nowhere near as great as russel crowe and jason donovan.

7:05 PM  
Blogger lynchy said...

Yeah, leave our Dutch friends alone. They are always good to us Aussies and Kiwis in Cannes (we all share a love of Heineken and Dutch blondes) and we should respect each other as small countries that punch well above our weight in the award stakes. And don't forget Andy Fackrell and Richard Bullock, our Aussie creative directors at 180 Amsterdam.

By the way, the population of the Netherlands is around 16m versus 20m for OZ and a mere 4m for New Zealand. Compare that to the USA (around 295m) and UK (around 60m).

7:07 PM  
Blogger lynchy said...

Actually, the population of Amsterdam is around 730,000.

And according to Cannes records, Springer & Jacoby Amsterdam won one Gold Lion last year (for the Olympus campaign), not four. You can't count each of the four executions in the campaign as four Gold Lions. (Nice try). But I may be wrong, my source is the Cannes Lions Archives on their net site.

By the way, the same Cannes source suggests that 180 Amsterdam won two, not three Gold Lions in 2004. One for a single Adidas spot ('Wake Up Call' written and art directed by Andy Fackrell), the other for the Adidas corporate image TV campaign (both spots in the campaign - 'Laila' and 'Long Run' - written by Richard Bullock).

7:34 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Why do people always use the 'beats working in a bank' analogy when they talk about how difficult advertising is? Do people who drop out of advertising get picked up by banks? Does that mean banks is the only thing it beats? The other one I heard was 'beats digging holes'. Holes seem pretty satisfying actually.

7:43 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

I personally am quite fond of holes.

9:28 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Just wait until I start up a one man agency in Lichtenstein and fluke an award. I'll turn this flyweight into a heavyweight creative hub overnight.

11:01 AM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Why not try and do it here in Australia? Come on, I dare ya. Instead of wasting time on fucking blogs why don't you go and make some ads that put your own miserable little agency on the map rather than whinge about the general state of the industry? Unless you work at Singo's, there is no excuse. Go on, time starts now...are you afraid....?

9:24 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

start ups are for jerks. If you're going to dare someone, at least, make it exciting or worthwhile. A juice bar, now that is where we all need be heading. Because come judgement day we're gonna burn for all those filthy little porkies we sold parents about how kellogs is good for their kids and how speaking more on your mobile is actually a benefit.

We are going to burn for all our sins.

4:28 AM  

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